SCORE

No business on Staten Island or elsewhere, no matter its size nor its industry, is immune to the risk of a disaster. So, experts advise business owners to prepare ahead of time, just in case of an emergency.

“Although mega-catastrophes, like earthquakes and major power outages, rarely occur, smaller-scale unwelcome events pose equal or greater risk because they happen more often,” said John J. Amodio chairman of SCORE Staten Island.

Whether you're facing a storm, flood, earthquake, fire, server failure, burst water pipe, data breach or some other disaster, your ability, or lack of, to recover quickly will affect your business's bottom line — and your employees, customers, vendors and suppliers.

FEMA estimates that nearly half of small businesses facing a disaster never reopen their doors. That’s why it’s critical to have a disaster recovery plan in place before the unthinkable strikes.

“Knowing what to do in an emergency will help you spring into action so you can resume serving your customers and community,” said Amodio.

To assist you in moving forward, Amodio offers these tips from SCORE and the U.S. Small Business Administration for things to consider when creating your disaster recovery plan:

1) What events pose a disaster risk to your business and how likely are each of them to occur?

2) Who will be on your recovery team and what are their roles and responsibilities?

3) What potential impact would a disaster have on your business? (For example, lost revenue, additional expense, unhappy customers, etc.)

4) Where will you temporarily relocate your business in the event of an emergency?

5) How will you communicate (internally and externally) during a disaster? Do you have emergency contact info readily accessible and multiple methods of communication available?

6) What procedures should be followed if you experience an interruption in accessing the technological tools necessary for running your business? What team members and vendors will manage the technical recovery process?

7) What data will need to be available at your off-site emergency location?

8) What are the critical business functions within your company and how will you restore them?

9) Do you have adequate insurance coverage to cover you in a disaster?

10) Do your vendors and suppliers have disaster recovery plans? Do you have backup vendors and suppliers you can depend on if yours are temporarily unable to serve you?

11) Have you communicated your disaster recovery plan with everyone within your organization and key business partners, so they're ready to act if an emergent situation arises?

The above suggestions are just a sampling of what you may need to address if ever you face an emergency that renders your business temporarily inoperable. If you need assistance in making sure you cover all the bases, consider reaching out to SCORE for guidance and feedback.

About SCORE Staten Island
SCORE Staten Island is dedicated to fostering a vibrant small-business community within its New York City borough by providing cost-free education and confidential mentoring to both aspiring and established entrepreneurs. Headquartered at 950 West Fingerboard Road, Grasmere, in the iconic Staten Island Advance Building, the organization is Chapter 476 of the nationwide SCORE, a nonprofit association and resource partner with the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). For additional information, or to schedule an appointment, SCORE Staten Island may be visited at https://statenisland.score.org; telephoned at 718-727-1221; emailed at info@SCORESI.org, and visited on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/SCOREStatenIsland.
 

 

Media Contact: Barton Horowitz
Relevant Public Relations, LLC
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11 Things to Consider for Creating a Disaster Recovery  Plan for Your Business